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Internet Explorer cannot discover network


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6 replies to this topic

#1 hansb

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 03:43 PM

Hi, experts, I'm running IE7 on XP SP2 on a Dell Latitude D600. It has been running fine for a long time. I'm running Norton Antivirus, Windows automatic update and some Firewall (unsure about which). I usually permit or block access from various components to DNS servers according to the recommendation presented by the Firewall(?)-dialogue. The other day I got an unusual message, saying something was trying to access my machine from the Internet. Despite the recommended "permit", I chose "block attempt". About 10 seconds later no web-page would show up, instead I got the standard "this web-area cannot be displayed". Yet, the network connection is fine (I can still use e-mail and download virus definition files and MS updates). I use a cable connection via switch to a combined router/dsl-modem. The computer I'm using just now is hanging on the same network, and works fine. It seems the network cannot be seen by IE7. I have tried the usual restarts (PC, network, DSL-modem). I've also tried Microsoft support help-articles, but have not found anything that makes a difference. Any advice will be highly appreciated. Greetings from Oslo, Norway. Hans
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#2 Ztruker

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 06:29 PM

Hi hansb, welcome to WTT.

This is perfect example of what System Restore was designed to fix. Please use it to restore to a date prior to when you denied access via your firewall.

Click on Start , Programs, Accessories, System Tools and finally System Restore. Make sure Restore my computer to an earlier time is selected then click on Next.

Chose a date prior to when the problem occurred.

Rich

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#3 DanielD

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Posted 11 September 2008 - 07:26 PM

This is perfect example of what System Restore was designed to fix. Please use it to restore to a date prior to when you denied access via your firewall.


I thought System Restore was a last resort? It seems that for a problem like this you wouldn't immediately go to that.

Hansb, you may try opening IE and going to Tools > Internet Options > Advanced (tab) and using the Reset... button. I would at least try that over a system restore.

Also, in the future, make sure you read what program it is before you block or permit it, especially if permit is recommended, as it usually isn't, indicating that the program was something you should of allowed.

Edited by Vectris, 11 September 2008 - 07:26 PM.

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#4 hansb

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 03:03 AM

Thank you for your suggestions, I tried the reset-button in IE, but the problem persists. I was unaware of the system restore function. I guess I will back up my documents and try that. Your advice on "reading the message before deciding action" is good. Trouble is its often quite difficult to understand the significance of the message. I shall pay more attention to this. Result of test will be posted here (in about 12 hrs from now). Thanks again.
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#5 Ztruker

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Posted 12 September 2008 - 03:23 PM

There are other ways around this I'm sure, but System Restore seemed to be the quickest, if it works. If it doesn't work then we'll try something else.

Also, I don't see System restore as a last resort fix. It's not like doing a reinstall of XP where at best you will lose updates and some installed programs (Repair install) or at worst, lose everything (Clean install). All it does it restore the registry and a specific set of critical XP files.

If hansb had ERUNT installed, I would recommend running one of it's backups to restore just the registry. It's unlikely though, as most people who have it installed would try it before coming here.

Another possibility is to uninstall the firewall and see if the problem goes away. Reinstall again ASAP of course.

Rich

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#6 Tallon41

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Posted 13 September 2008 - 12:47 AM

I thought System Restore was a last resort? It seems that for a problem like this you wouldn't immediately go to that.


Nah. It is a VERY useful tool. I have however, seen and read accounts of people attempting to use that tool incorrectly.

The important thing to remember about system restore is "WHAT is it offering to 'restore'.....? The Registry Hive files.

Will this solve a "driver" problem ? Very rarely. If settings were changed in the Utility that resulted in not being able to boot into any mode, then a System Restore (SR) will put it back the way it was, (and sometimes "Last Known Good Config" will do the same.) If the problem is with the underlying driver sys etc files, then a SR will accomplish next to nothing.

Will SR correct "file system" errors ? No. CHKDSK is for that.

SFC, Repair, Parallel, or Full Installs, (backup if possible on both,) I would consider more "last results" (in that order.)

Using a CD based on BART PE, (or XPE,) will allow you to boot from a CD outside the OS and work directly on it. Even load a 'remote' registry (the one on the C: drive, ) and edit it as if you were booted into it. (think virus / root kit cleaning.)

It is also DANGEROUS to use SR after a malware clean. I will typically disable SR reboot, then enable SR and create a point, this to ensure a user cannot re-infected him/her self in a moment of not thinking clearly.

Good AVirus programs will scan Sys Volume, but I have seen some slip through.

Tallon41

Edited by Tallon41, 13 September 2008 - 12:49 AM.


#7 hansb

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Posted 19 September 2008 - 05:26 PM

Well, I finally found the answer. I realized there is a logfile to the symantec firewall, and indeed my wrongful blocking of something was logged there. Thus, I made it to the rules, and reviewed rules regarding the blocked application (IE), permitted access, and - everything fine... Thank you for your support, it made me goin' (rather than running out to buy another computer...) :wavey:
Regards hansb - - - Eager to ask - willing to share

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