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Hotmail Hacked?


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12 replies to this topic

#1 manicd

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 05:36 PM

Hi

I think my Hotmail account has been hacked - What protocol should I follow if this is the case?

I basically I'm receiving emails stating the following:

This is an automatically generated Delivery Status Notification.

Delivery to the following recipients failed.

--Forwarded Message Attachment--
From: MY EMAIL ADDRESS IS HERE
To: MY EMAIL CONTACTS ARE HERE
Subject:
Date: Fri, 11 Nov 2011 08:02:38 +0000
Our meds consist of natural components... THERE IS A RANDOM WEBSITE ADDRESS INSERTED HERE.

The email also comes with an .eml attachment marked as 'No Subject':

I've already changed my password - What else should I be thinking about?

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#2 Ztruker

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 07:12 PM

This seems to be a plague right now. Both my and my daughters Yahoo E-mail accounts were hacked in the laast few days. I just deleted mine ans did my daughter. She switched to Gmail, I use my normal ISP account. I used my Yahoo account for online registrations. Beginning to look like a really good idea. I think I'll setup another one for the same purpose.

Rich

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.


#3 chrisking73

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:10 AM

There are a few things to check. Are there actually just fake messages? - Who is the email actually from? Can you click on the sender to get more details? - Has the email actually been sent from your mailbox? Check sent items and deleted items. If its not there then it's very likely it's just a fake message and nobody has actually accessed your email. - Change your password to, make sure it's strong. - Are you infected? Has somebody remotely accessed emails? Let us know what you find out.

#4 chrisking73

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 06:29 AM

Also just to add, I know there is malware out there which has the ability to send emails to all of your contacts telling them to visit sites to spread the infection. I would recommend getting your system checked here for free as it could be an infection.

#5 Doug

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 11:09 AM

Also just to add, I know there is malware out there which has the ability to send emails to all of your contacts telling them to visit sites to spread the infection. I would recommend getting your system checked here for free as it could be an infection.


Change your password before the hijacker changes your secret ID questions and locks you out completely.
That may be enough, but I wouldn't delay further investigation of possible Malware on your machine.

Particularly if several of the addresses in your address book have received the errant email.
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#6 Ztruker

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 04:30 PM

My mistake was uploading all my E-mail contacts to the Yahoo account. I won't do that again.

Rich

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.


#7 manicd

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Posted 15 November 2011 - 08:54 AM

There are a few things to check.

Are there actually just fake messages?

- Who is the email actually from? Can you click on the sender to get more details?
- Has the email actually been sent from your mailbox? Check sent items and deleted items. If its not there then it's very likely it's just a fake message and nobody has actually accessed your email.


It seems as though the email has come from my email address & the messages also appear in my sent items.

- Change your password to, make sure it's strong.
- Are you infected? Has somebody remotely accessed emails?

Let us know what you find out.


I have changed my password and I am hoping for the best.
My log is currently being looked at over in the Virus, Spyware & Malware Removal forum - Please see here
Thanks to everyone for their replies


#8 manicd

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 05:10 PM

Blottedisk kindly posted a link to what may have been the problem.
Email Spoofing
If I was indeed a victim of a spoof email how would Spammers include my contacts to be recipients of the email?

N.B
Here are the site analysis of the link that were contained in the spoof/spam email.
McAfee | SiteAdvisor
Norton Web Safe

Edited by manicd, 24 November 2011 - 03:44 AM.


#9 manicd

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 03:36 PM

UPDATE:
I logged in for the fist time today & was greeted with this message/page (Please See Below).
Is someone or something still trying to hack my account?

Hack01.jpg

#10 Ztruker

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 05:19 PM

Absolutely. Good that you changed your password.

Rich

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.


#11 manicd

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 06:51 PM

Thank you for your reply Ztruker

Absolutely.

You mean they are? It's very frustrating that I am being targeted.


#12 Ztruker

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 07:16 PM

You and a million other people. This goes on all the time, especially once they thought they had one to use. If it continues, the best thing to do is delete the account and create a new one with a different name. That's what I did with my Yahoo E-mail account.

Rich

Artificial intelligence is no match for natural stupidity.


#13 Doug

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Posted 25 November 2011 - 08:09 PM

Manicd, This type of exploit is related to "someone else" capturing your password. The "source" could be: -- local (someone looking over your shoulder when you logged in) (a "friend" whom you allowed to use your machine) -- Someone locally (a neighbor, etc. or someone war-driving) gained access to your machine via wireless broadcast hack of your router -- Malware infection... keylogger captured your password and sent it to someone wishing to exploit it -- a remote exploit at a site where you are a member or where you save data remotely (someone hacked the site data base) ________________________________________ Regardless of the "source", you have discovered that "someone" has been able to gain access to your Windows Live ID related to hotmail.com. You should change "all" of your local and online passwords. You should be sure that you do not use the same password for more than one login location. You should confirm that your machine is not infected with trojan/keylogger malicious script. You should change the name and password of your Router plus you should change your WPA2 encryption Best Regards
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