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Internet Explorer 9


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#1 Elizabeth Clare

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Posted 12 April 2011 - 11:55 PM

Hi Everybody! I've read mixed reviews out there about Internet Explorer 9. Some say that it's hard to uninstall if you aren't happy with it. Does anyone here in the WTT Community have any insights? Maybe it's too early to tell because it's so new? One thing's for sure.. they've got free download opportunitities in so many places that if you aren't ready to decide about getting it... you have to be careful that you don't download it by mistake!! It's even listed as an "important" update on my windows update list and one time I found it as a "mini-icon" hovering right next to my minimize button! (Wonder how it got there?) Sounds like it's important to get it, but not sure if it's a bad decision to wait? Thanks for any input!
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#2 paws

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 02:36 AM

Hi Elizabeth, I haven't had a great deal of experience with it so far, apart from customers who phone up saying that they can't find any of the "controls" that they had been acustomed to using on previous versions....... I explain that its the new "clean and uncluttered interface"...... quite a few of them mutter darkly that its so clean and uncluttered that they can't find the stuff they need!..... However they had better get used to it as its the latest fashion! It was designed with Win 7 in mind, and also works on Vista, but not on XP (most of my customers are sticking with XP for the next few years...until security support finally runs out in 2014) Regards paws
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#3 Nahumi

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 03:55 AM

Hello Elizabeth Clare, I just went through the installation process myself and it feels a bit "extreme". Doing it via Windows Update certainly makes it easier, and you can be sure it's the right one. My concern with the installation was that it required me to close down a lot of applications, in particular Avast! and a few other semi-important applications. Once installed, Windows will restart and you'll have IE 9. It'll completely replace whichever version you have currently installed. As for IE9 itself, it feels fairly responsive and pages seem to load quickly. This is great for low end systems which often feel like they're "chugging" through a lot of work. I don't think you'll notice much difference on high end machines, but it's certainly noticeable on netbooks etc. The interface is okay, but I think they may have gone a bit far with the "space saving" design. The address bar , which doubles up as your search bar, is now on the same line as your tabs. You can resize the address/search bar to make more room for tabs on a smaller screen. You can access all your options through a single "options" icon. This is similar to Google Chrome's Wrench. This should, in theory, make it easier to modify IE9 for your own purposes. Allthough there are a few plusses, there are some major design flaws. The begin with, the "forward and back" buttons are a bit big. I hardly ever use them, I just use "backspace", and I imagine most people do that too. I don't see the logic in making a feature out of these buttons. Secondly, Microsoft have missed a key part of "space saving", which is to use every bit of space for something. Taking stuff out of the UI is great, but it's pointless if you don't use all the space you've got. It's like buying a house with a 2 acre garden and only using a few square feet. The problem is that the "Minimise, Expand and Close" buttons are on a different line to all the tabs and the address/search bar. This creates a lot of unused space above all the other content. Moving everything onto one line, with a bit of space above it to allow users to move the window, would be far more space efficient. Other than that, it's a much better browser than all previous itterations. It's definitely worth upgrading if you don't feel like moving to a third party browser such as Google Chrome or Firefox. I hope that helps a little, Cheers, Nahumi
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#4 Lee

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 02:34 PM

G'day Elizabeth, IE9 seems to be a copy of Google Chrome, which copied the Opera 'minimal look'. However, unlike Opera, Chrome never stopped at minimal look, they ended up with minimal convenience as well. IE9 has trodden the same path IMHO. Both Chrome and IE9 inventors believe minimal is the new 'cool' :lol: The IE9 interface has only two buttons, 'Previous' and 'Next' and the address bar also serves as a search bar. It also has a relatively high memory consumption and lacks (reasonable) options for managing favorites. Just like Google Chrome, IE9's lacks interface customization, which I found to be a frustrating annoyance. At least it is a faster browser than IE8, but considering how slow IE8 is, that's not really saying much. As we can pick and choose between numerous browsers nowadays, IE8 will appeal to some, but for me it hit the bin fairly quickly. I'm (mostly) happy with Opera and the occasional use of IE8. Cheers, Lee

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#5 Elizabeth Clare

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 05:03 PM

Dear paws and Nahumi,

Thank you SO much for you insights! I do have some additional questions, though { :blush: ~ as per usual!} that were inspired by your wonderful responses.


from paws
can't find any of the "controls" that they had been acustomed to using on previous versions..

I read about this problem, too. I read somewhere that most of the toolbar features are found now on a list that can be viewed all under one button on the upper right corner of the screen. I learned that it can be moved to the otherside, should the user so desire.

Problem: I share my computer with my Dad who is 81 and my Mom who is 77. It is imperative that I keep the screens as familiar as possible for them so they will remain comfortable using the computer. It is very difficult for them when things get changed around. Would keeping what we have, put us in a compromised state now or in the future? or is downloading IE 9 more a question of style rather than function?


from paws
"clean and uncluttered interface"

What does "interface" mean?


from paws
It was designed with Win 7 in mind, and also works on Vista, but not on XP (most of my customers are sticking with XP

I thought to install IE9, see how it works, then uninstall if it's not working or we don't like it. HOWEVER... I heard some had much trouble uninstalling IE9 and even if you are successful.. you may end up with NOTHING for a browser (not even your old one) because I heard that if you install IE9, it automatically deletes any trace of your former browser.

I'm still trying to get a handle on the meaning of terms. Windows 7, Vista and XP are Microsoft/HP Operating Systems (OS) ~ right? The other major OS is MAC. I've heard there were others too... but I don't know what they are, nor how many there are. I don't know what the differences are between "Windows 7", Vista(s) and XP.

I have:
Microsoft Windows Vista Home Premium
Version 6.0 (Build 6002: Service Pack 2)
Copyright 2007

I guess there are more than one kind of "Vista". Some Vistas don't update any more, are no longer serviceable over the internet, nor have features needed to be compatible with many otherwise popular and useful functions - including, I think, IE9.

It seems if you have Vista Home Premium with a Service Pack 2 - you are still current and could, presumably, support IE 9. The key is... you have to have "Service Pack 2"... I think.

What, if any, significance is there to having:

  • Version 6.0
  • Build 6002
  • Copyright 2007



I used to think I had "Windows 7" because the copyright is "2007" and my start-up button lists "Microsoft Office programs (Word, Excel and PowerPoint) as "2007". (ie: I understood the "7" in Windows 7 as referring to the year it was released). :smack:

Then I'm confused because is says "Version 6.0" so thought I had "Windows 6".
I don't know what a "Build" is nor what the number "6002" stands for.
I don't know how HP fits into all of this.

Could some of these items help to predict success, failure or ability to download and/or use IE9?
If I had to guess... would I be correct to say...

HP {Hewlett-Packard}: manufacturer of my computer's tower containing properly assembled items such as: various interesting pieces of function specific metal and/or plastic; a motherboard of chips; various wiring conglamorations; and other various computer parts. These items work together to perform some required/some nice-yet-optional computer functions at the touch of the "on" button. to satisfy the needs and requests of various types of Potential Computer Users.

I imagine that in attempts to satisfy the needs and requests of various types (profiles) and budgets of Potential Computer Users, Hardware Design Teams make important decisions in choice of materials and where they are placed. I'll bet these choices are highly influenced (and perhaps mostly dictated) by visionary, financially-resourceful company Producers who integrate both solicited and unsolicited proposals and requests from various sources (in-house ideas, marketing research, customer suggestions/requests, feedback from various IT experts, etc.).

Anyway... here's what I think I have... could anyone correct me if I'm wrong?

My tower says "HP Pavilion Slimline" with a "Windows Vista" and "AMD 64 Live" sticker on it.


HP Pavilion Slimline: model name of my computer hardware?
Windows Vista and AMD 64 Live: factory default Operating Systems? {OS}



What is AMD 64 Live?


Home Premium (vs "Home Basic" or possible other Vista types): type of Windows Vista?
Version 6.0: "edition" number of my original factory installed Windows Vista Home Premium?
Build: "Package" used by factory to augment any particular "version" ?
6002: specific "template" number indicating specific "package" used to augment version?
Service Pack 2 : (vs Service Pack 1) Level of 6002 augmentation?
Copyright 2007: Year all these things put together were released?



from Nahumi
My concern with the installation was that it required me to close down a lot of applications, in particular Avast! and a few other semi-important applications

Could you reopen your apps after they were closed down? or are your apps not supported by IE9?

What is "Avast"?




from Nahumi
Once installed, Windows will restart and you'll have IE 9. It'll completely replace whichever version you have currently installed.

This is the part I'm nerveous about in case I need to uninstall and reinstall the previous browser - which, by the way, I don't know which IE version it is... do you know how I can find out?


from Nahumi
feels fairly responsive and pages seem to load quickly. This is great for low end systems

I think mine is a low end system. :huh:
What are "netbooks"?


from Nahumi
The interface is okay...

What is an "interface"?



from Nahumi
The address bar , which doubles up as your search bar, is now on the same line as your tabs. You can resize the address/search bar to make more room for tabs on a smaller screen. You can access all your options through a single "options" icon. This is similar to Google Chrome's Wrench. This should, in theory, make it easier to modify IE9 for your own purposes.

Hmmm... sounds like a lot of preliminary button pushing before getting to work? Or can you save settings?



from Nahumi
...the "forward and back" buttons are a bit big. I hardly ever use them, I just use "backspace", and I imagine most people do that too.

wow! Backspace to change windows? I've never heard of that. How does that work?



from Nahumi
Secondly, Microsoft have missed a key part of "space saving", which is to use every bit of space for something. Taking stuff out of the UI is great, but it's pointless if you don't use all the space you've got. It's like buying a house with a 2 acre garden and only using a few square feet.

:lol: ! Proper use of space is important to me too! Maybe they could merge together all the unused space and give the User options on what to do with it!


from Nahumi
The problem is that the "Minimise, Expand and Close" buttons are on a different line to all the tabs and the address/search bar. This creates a lot of unused space above all the other content. Moving everything onto one line, with a bit of space above it to allow users to move the window, would be far more space efficient.

You mean you can't even move the window to acheive full screen? They could at least use that area for users to place frequently used "pin" buttons!


from Nahumi
Other than that, it's a much better browser than all previous itterations. It's definitely worth upgrading if you don't feel like moving to a third party browser such as Google Chrome or Firefox.

What's a "third party" browser?

from Nahumi
I hope that helps a little,

:D Thank you SO much Nahumi and paws! You helped a LOT !! :thumbup:


:notworthy:


Yours newly in Technology,
ELIZABETH CLARE
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#6 Elizabeth Clare

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 05:13 PM

Dear WTT Community, It seems I need help in the formatting for posts department. I will work on this. Sincerely :smack:
Yours newly in Technology,
ELIZABETH CLARE
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#7 Nahumi

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 05:42 PM

Questions are always good. :P

1. I could reopen my applications after they were closed, but they were not automatically restarted after IE9 was installed. This is not so much of a problem because you'll have to restart your computer once the installation is done. All the applications that were closed before the installation will be restarted when you restart your computer. As far as I know IE9 supports everything that all previous version have.

Avast! (yes, it really does have an exclamation mark in the name, :P) is a free Anti-Virus software suite. It scans your computer for virus' and other malicious software designed to cause havoc on your computer or to steal data.

2. You can figure out which version you currently have by clicking 'Tools' and then 'About Internet Explorer'. I'm not sure how easy it is to revert back to IE8. My guess is that it isn't going to be particularly easy.

3. Netbooks are small form factor laptops. That basically means they're little laptops. They tend to have energy efficient components to make them ultra portable. Wikipedia entry :
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Netbook

4. The 'interface' is what you see on your screen. All the buttons, the task bar, your icons, everything is part of the 'interface'. It is often refered to as the "User Interface" or the "Graphical User Interface" or GUI for short. So when we talk about the look, feel and usability of IE9 we're also talking about the interface.

5. Yeah, you would think that reducing everything down to one button would make the process of changing options longer, but it's actually quite simple. You just have to click the "cog" icon and then click on "Internet Options". That's all there is to it.

6. Using backspace doesn't change windows, it just goes to the page you were previously on. So lets say you did a Google search and clicked on the top entry, instead of typing in "www.google.com" and searching again you can just hit backspace to go back to the Google results page. If you hold the "Shift" button and then hit Backspace it goes 'forward' a page, i.e the page you left when you went backwards. These keyboard shortcuts are often much quicker than clicking buttons. There's a recent topic on keyboard shortcuts here :

http://forums.whatth...yboard shortcut

You might have to scroll down a bit to find the useful links on some common keyboard shortcuts.

7 / 8 . Yes, it would be nice if they merged everything and gave users a bit more control over what they saw, but I think it's unlikely. The unused space at the top of window is simply used to move it around, and you're right it would be a great place to put bookmarks or something similar. You can still resize the window or maximize it, but the unused space is still there. In terms of "screen real estate", as in how much space it takes up on your computer screen, it's less than third party browsers (read below for the explanation on that). But although it takes up less room on your screen, it shows much less information.

9. A "third party" browser is an internet browser that isn't made by Microsoft. Some of the more notable alternatives to Microsoft's Internet Explorer is Google Chrome (Made by the guys who own and run the Google search engine), Mozilla Firefox, Apple's Safari (The guys who made the iPod) and Opera. There is always a lot of competition between all these companies to make the "best" Internet Browser. It often comes down to personal preference when choosing your Internet Browser, but the important thing to remember is that you always have a choice. If you don't like Internet Explorer you can always try a different browser.

I hope that goes some way to answering your questions. :)
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#8 Ztruker

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 06:25 PM

Elizabeth, I've installed and uninstalled and reinstalled IE9 at least 3 times, never had a problem with either install or uninstall.

As for look and feel, you can make it look a lot like IE8 by turning on the various toolbars:

Posted Image

Just right click on the empty area to the right of the Google tab shown here and select the 4 toolbars and it will look like above. Sort of defeats the nice clean look it has when you install it and all that function is available star and wheel icons at top right, but if that's you're preference or if you think your folks might be more comfortable with it then give it a try.

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#9 Elizabeth Clare

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Posted 13 April 2011 - 07:57 PM

Hi Nahumi and Ztrucker! Thank you SO much for your responses! Thank you so much for helping me to understand things! More later... :blush:
Yours newly in Technology,
ELIZABETH CLARE
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#10 Jimbo1

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Posted 14 April 2011 - 03:20 PM

9 blah, me wants to :rant2: to MS for excluding us poor xp users. Got 9 on my laptop, taking a bit getting use to it but so far I like it. Again wished I have it for xp :( Jimbo1

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#11 k007d

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Posted 21 April 2011 - 02:16 PM

Elizabeth, I've installed and uninstalled and reinstalled IE9 at least 3 times, never had a problem with either install or uninstall.

As for look and feel, you can make it look a lot like IE8 by turning on the various toolbars:

Posted Image

Just right click on the empty area to the right of the Google tab shown here and select the 4 toolbars and it will look like above. Sort of defeats the nice clean look it has when you install it and all that function is available star and wheel icons at top right, but if that's you're preference or if you think your folks might be more comfortable with it then give it a try.

Ztruker,
I've been wondering where everything had gone till i read this reply,thanks.
I like the minimalist design,more space on the screen and it is certainly quick.
Don't know about the rescources angle but like Win7 i am presently surprised. :)

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