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#1 Tophat

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 06:45 AM

A quick few questions about Linux, if you please.... With there been about 25+ different Linux OS out there which would you know to pick? I know with say Home Basic, Pro, Ultimate, Business etc what I would have or lack depending on the version, but with Linux is it the same or not? Which Linux is equivalent to Vista Ultimate? I play World of Warcraft, odd bit of Word processing, Music, DVD's, Internet and Photo Editing from time to time. Is there lots of programs you can get (FREEWARE) for Linux when it's installed? Is there an equivalent security package that I could get for Linux like I use for Windows? If I installed Linux on my PC (which also has Vista Ultimate) would it allow me to make a separate partition to duel-boot or would i have to create a partition first? Thanks! :wavey:

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#2 Nahumi

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 09:29 AM

Hey Tophat,

Despite the recent work towards making Linux easier to use, it still tends to be an enthusiasts hobby. Most people don't ditch Windows all together unless they are completely sure that their Linux distribution will work for them. They also tend to have a lot of know-how about installing Linux drivers etc.

So to your answers :

1. You're right, there are a lot of Linux distributions out there. I would pick one depending on what I wanted to do with it. If I wanted to diagnose some hardware problems I would pick Puppy Linux because of it's size. If I wanted something which had a massive community and was similar to windows, I would pick Ubuntu.

I think in your case, Ubuntu would be your best bet. It has a lot of people working on it, which means that if you run into any problems, you will probably find a fix for it fairly quickly.

2 , 3 and 5. Microsoft creates separate price points for Windows for purely commercial reasons. They know that not everyone can afford to pay the full whack for Vista Ultimate, so they offer stripped down versions at lower prices. In the long run this means they get more money.

Linux distributions don't really have to do this because they are open source and free. So when you pick a Linux distribution, you'll be getting the whole thing. They may offer "optimised" versions for netbooks, but is simply stripped down for hardware reasons.

4. You will be able to find a fair bit of Linux native software out there, some freeware, some not. But don't expect everything to run natively.

6. Some free anti-virus applications do run natively in Linux. Consider getting Avast! 5 for Linux:

http://www.avast.com...ux-home-edition

7. You will have to create a partition using the Vista Partition Manager to dual boot Linux and Vista on your PC.


As for playing WoW, you may run into a few problems. Once you've installed Linux and got all the drivers sorted (which can take a lot of time if you have to manually find them and install them for each bit of hardware), you'll need to run WoW through something called WINE. They say it isn't an emulator...but in essence it is. Your performance can be hit pretty badly too. It might not...but there is a chance that it will.

So in essence, if all you're wanting to do is play WoW and all the usual stuff, just stick with Vista Ultimate. Linux doesn't really offer anything over Windows, other than it's free.

If you're still interested in running WoW on linux, this is a good tutorial.


I hope that answers your questions.

Nahumi
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#3 paws

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 11:41 AM

Hi Tophat,
Nahumi, has provided you with an excellent response, and given you some good links for extra information.
If you install Ubuntu, for example, then the Installer routine will usually give you the choice of either overwriting your existing Windows partition or creating a multi boot situation, however you will need to be careful that you select the install method you actually want...

If you just want to dip your toe in the water so to speak without actually altering your hard drive, then why not consider using a Live disto of Ubuntu (or any other distro of Linux) the Live distro will run entirely within RAM, and nothing need be written to your hard drive at all. This approach will provide you with a flavour of the Linux experience without any permanent changes, (but don't expect WOW to run)..... it will all disappear when you log off and reboot into Windows.
Here's another link that provides some "contrast and compare" information on Windows and Linux
http://www.tuxradar.com/node/33
Good luck with your research.
Regards
paws
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#4 Tophat

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 12:06 PM

Thanks both of you for the excellent replies! ;) I have a Linux disc Live not sure which it is, had it for a few years now but I quite like it and I wanted something to try out and play with but that would hopefully allow me to do what I do now on Windows. I certainly wouldn't be getting rid of Vista, that's why I mentioned the partition factor. I don't want to delete the information that is Windows either so if Ubuntu will allow me to make a separate partition to duel-boot then that sounds good to me. If it doesn't play WOW or it's very hard to make it do that then I still have Windows don't I? :P Thanks again! :thumbup:

#5 Tophat

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 12:09 PM

Linspire Live :blush: That's the one I have!!!

#6 paws

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 12:12 PM

Ah! yes I remember it... I think that was the one that was originally called Lindows, but the legal boys made them change the name.....
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#7 Tophat

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Posted 11 April 2010 - 12:19 PM

I have come across the following which I found from another site explaining the different options and what is best suited to you: Debian Ubuntu Ark Linux Mandriva This is what it suggested for me and you both said Ubuntu. What do the others lack or include then? Ark looks basic but I haven't used Linux once, apart from Linspire. I have used a Mac before, but most of my experience came from Windows 98-Vista, so something simple to start and (fingers crossed) no cmd line type programming to make things work on Linux lol as I wouldn't have the foggiest... :lol:

#8 Doug

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Posted 13 April 2010 - 08:54 PM

I've fallen in with a bunch who enjoy and advocate SUSE 11.2
Here's the iso for your convenience: http://software.opensuse.org/112/en


Both SUSE or Ubuntu will install a boot loader (grub) which will carefully set aside your Windows OS and then create separate partitions for the Linux installation in a format that is not recognizable from Windows. (EXT3 or EXT4) (compared to NTFS file system)

The ordinary expected experience is that the installation of Linux will proceed flawlessly and when you reboot, you will be presented with a gui from which to select to boot into either your Windows OS or the Linux OS.

The "Rule of Thumb" for installing dual boot is: Install the "older/slower" before the "newer/faster".
That means install windows first, and then follow with an installation of Linux which will take command of the bootloader.
It really doesn't go as smoothly if you first install Linux and then add Windows. (doable but not recommended.)
Neither is it necessary to install any sort of boot utility, since Linux bootloader (grub) will ignore it anyway.

Word of caution: The above is characterized as "ordinary expected", but your mileage may vary.
For instance, I have a machine with Windows XP Pro SP3 already set up the way I like it.
I decided to also install SUSE 11.1 (and other version than recommended above)
The SUSE installation went as expected, until it got to the point of "writing system configuration"
At that point, the installer and even the installer auto-repair could not verify the packages (pieces of the installation)
I got stuck in an endless failing loop.

I ended up with my prior Windows and my new Linux, but couldn't gain access to either.
Using various utilities, I could "see" both, but boot neither.

I tried to use Recovery Console to repair Windows MFT (clear attributes, Del boot.ini, BootCFG /rebuild, Fixboot) to no avail.... I was locked out.

I had to revert to my Acronis Rescue CD and Restore the Windows Partition from a backup image.
All is well and good now, thanks to my forethought to create a full disk image backup.

Moral of the story:
If you depend upon the machine that you also intend to use for your Linux experiment...
Have all of your important documents and media backed up securely outside of the Hard Drive you will be using.
I'd go so far as to recommend that you first obtain and use an image backup tool such as Acronis before launching your Linux career.
It is "rare" for a Linux Distro installation media to fail, but if it does you could end up being locked out completely like I was.
Disk Image backup is a wonderful thing, and Acronis is my favorite.

I would compare SUSE favorably with Ubuntu.
Either are pretty much "out of the box" experiences, including fully automated installation similar to Windows wizard graphical user interface.

SUSE installation also installs Firefox and I think also Open Office.

To view online clips such as YouTube, you will have to separately install JAVA JRE and Flash Player.

From there, it is just a matter of using it and gaining experience.
Since it is set up with internet browser, email client, office utilities you will already be able to do the basics.

When it comes to graphics editing with your favorite tools, you will likely run into some cmd line scripting to get drivers and such set up.

When your time and inclination come to the point of wishing to learn about Linux, instead of just enjoying the out-of-the-box use, there are a couple of interesting resources.

http://lowfatlinux.com/ <-- I know this fellow locally and know that he is both an excellent teacher, and highly ethical.

http://h30187.www3.h...ight/model_desc <-- this is the course offerings from HP Learning Center (consider Linux 101 which is an intro to Debian Linux)

And a note about Linux related websites with Forum style help.

Linux enthusiasts are generally hard working and decent folk, who expect the same from visitors.
That means that if they have already written an answer to your question and posted it, they expect you to search and read before you start posting "newbie questions" that have already been answered.
They might even ignore your question until you demonstrate that you "get their point" that they are providing the help and often the compiled software for free at the expense of their own effort and love of learning.

Be decent and hard working and they will more likely treat you with the same in return.

Have a great time.
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#9 Tophat

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 01:34 AM

Hi Doug, Thank you for the reply. Great read, I'll look into that and see how I get on. I have used Acronis before and so I know what you mean, it's a great backup tool. :wavey:

#10 paws

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 02:34 AM

Following on from Doug's usual excellent advice........ If everyone followed it and made a disc image, kept it safe on removable media, verified it, and made a bootable CD then repair shops like mine would probably have to close down! For quite a few years now the bulk of my income has come from troubleshooting software/Windows problems and fixing them...... If folks took sensible steps like using correctly, disc imaging ...then many of us would be in dire financial straights! ........ :pullhair: Regards paws
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#11 Tophat

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Posted 14 April 2010 - 08:53 AM

Hehe, yeah where would we be without customers who need a service, both on this form and as you say Paws from hardware/Software related issues and more! :P

#12 chenchen21621

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 01:11 AM

Nahumi, has provided you with an excellent response, and given you some good links for extra information.
If you install Ubuntu, for example, then the Installer routine will usually give you the choice of either overwriting your existing Windows partition or creating a multi boot situation, however you will need to be careful that you select the install method you actually want...
:P :P :P :P :P :P


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Edited by paws, 18 October 2010 - 01:25 AM.


#13 paws

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Posted 18 October 2010 - 01:27 AM

@chenchen21621 Your post contained an active link to an advertising site..... I have therefore removed it for you. Regards paws
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