Jump to content

Build Theme!
  •  
  • Infected?

WE'RE SURE THAT YOU'LL LOVE US!

Hey there! :wub: Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account. When you create an account, we remember exactly what you've read, so you always come right back where you left off. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. You can like posts to share the love. :D Join 91804 other members! Anybody can ask, anybody can answer. Consistently helpful members may be invited to become staff. Here's how it works. Virus cleanup? Start here -> Malware Removal Forum.

Try What the Tech -- It's free!


Photo

Learning programming

learning programming

  • Please log in to reply
5 replies to this topic

#1 Huetj

Huetj

    Authentic Member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 05 June 2015 - 02:07 AM

For a computing novice interested in learning programming, which one is it best to learn first _ or doesn't it matter. Is the "Basic" language still useful, or has it been superseded by other languages? 


    Advertisements

Register to Remove


#2 paws

paws

    Tech Team

  • Administrator
  • 5,965 posts

Posted 06 June 2015 - 01:39 AM

Hi Huetj

That's an interesting question....

If you were to ask 6 different programmers the same question you could actually get 6 different answers!

 

Here's a link that provides some information that may help you get started:

http://uk.businessin...nguages-2014-12

 

Its not a bad idea to set out questions that you might consider before going too far down one individual programming language... this is what I have in mind.

 

1 What do you intend to programme..... Drivers, websites, web aps or mobile aps, etc and will it be for commercial purposes or as a hobby, or do you just want to learn to think like a coder or whatever?

 

2 If you are more concerned with instant results then something like Scratch might be interesting for you, followed possibly by Python, and or Javascript......

 

The previous mentioned are not so critical in terms of syntax compared with the disciplines of C etc but as always have a good look around decide what you want to be able to achieve, set yourself measurable but realistic goals, decide upon a timeframe and go for it..!

 

BASIC gave many of us an introduction that (some of us) look back fondly on...... However I would be inclined to move directly towards a drag and drop type type scenario  to see how you get on...( paws now dons tin helmet!)

Good luck with it

regards

paws


The help you receive here is free. If you wish to show your appreciation, then you may donate to help keep us online. http://www.whatthetech.com/donate

#3 Huetj

Huetj

    Authentic Member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 06 June 2015 - 02:56 AM

Thanks for the advice Paws. I take it that there is no standard learning path which follows some hierarchical order which builds up from easiest to hardest which students usually take. What you learn is purely 'objective driven'. At the moment I don't really know what I'll do with it, it's just part of my self-learning process in computing.

#4 paws

paws

    Tech Team

  • Administrator
  • 5,965 posts

Posted 06 June 2015 - 08:48 AM

If you start with something like Scratch

https://scratch.mit.edu/

you should be able to see fairly instant results..... this can be quite encouraging and then you can move on. There's nothing like seeing your own programme or your own game to spur you on to greater things!

 

You are right there is no one single path , however if you were to start with C

(a very powerful and important language) then because of the disciplines of having to use strict syntax, some folks tend to find it too demanding, lose heart, and a promising programming career can be negatively affected.

Regards

paws


The help you receive here is free. If you wish to show your appreciation, then you may donate to help keep us online. http://www.whatthetech.com/donate

#5 Tomk

Tomk

    Beguilement Monitor

  • Classroom Admin
  • 20,150 posts

Posted 06 June 2015 - 10:17 AM

Paws (as always) has provided well thought out and solid advice. :notworthy:

 

I'm not a programmer and I've never played one on TV, but I also have fond memories of basic which I came much closer to understanding than any other language back in the day.  I've played around with many languages since and completed a wide variety of tutorials on the web (I believe I've completed all the tutorials at Codecademy at least once) and my opinion is the easiest to learn are Javascript and Python.  I have not tried Scratch and many non-programmers build tools with AutoIT.

 

My advice it to be concerned less with the language, than you are with the program.  It seems to me that those who program for programming sake get bored, frustrated, and quit.  However, if you have a clearly defined goal of what you want to accomplish with a specific program... you just need to pick a language and learn enough about it to accomplish your goal.  After that you can either continue to learn about your language of choice and refine your program, or you can try your hand at rebuilding the program in a different language and see how it goes.  Either way, you will be building on knowledge that you have already internalized.

 

Most importantly... have fun - or you should be spending your time doing something else. ;)


  • inzanity likes this

Tomk
------------------------------------------------------------

mvplogo1_zpsea7gtc7e.gif


WTT-Grad1.jpg

Topics are closed after 5 days without response
unite_blue_zpsbfd3cd98.png


#6 Huetj

Huetj

    Authentic Member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPip
  • 22 posts

Posted 06 June 2015 - 10:34 PM

Thanks Tomk and Paws for your helpful advice. 


Related Topics



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users