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Android 64 bit


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#1 Peter1

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 09:58 AM

I have a 64 bit pc with Win 8.1 and want to use Oracle's VM to install Android's OS.
I cannot find an Android OS with 64 bit.

Do I need the 64 bit and if so, here would I find one?

 


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#2 terry1966

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Posted 25 April 2014 - 04:04 PM

no you can run 32bit or 64bit os in a vm.

 

android is a mobile os mostly used on phones/tablets which don't have 64bit hardware so there is no 64bit android out at the moment tho it is coming soon.

 

:popcorn:



#3 Peter1

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 06:39 AM

Thanks terry

I had fun playing with it. I copy YouTube tutorials to create the VM's then the guest OS using my Win 8.1 as the host. I used Oracle as I find it the easiest..

 

May I ask, if a pc is used a lot for 2 1/2  years, is it a good idea to either reinstall the OS or refresh the machine?

I noticed my laptop is running a bit hotter and the fan runs faster  a bit more. Nothing drastic though.

I have  cleaned it from the outside, as I cannot do the inside of the laptop. This dell is configured so a couple of screws does not expose much..

 

The desktop shows a few funny signs too especially Word but then again nothing to complain about.

As I say they are really used a lot so wondered if I should refresh/reinstall.

I tested the hard ware and all tested out fine. The hard drives reported 100 % ok. The Dell diagnostics are quite thorough.

 

Peter



#4 terry1966

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 08:54 AM

wouldn't say it was a good or bad idea.

 

pc's can run for years without problems, so unless your os is running slow and you don't have any software issues then i see no reason to do a re-install of the os.

 

a re-install won't make any difference to hardware issues like noisy fans or high temps either.

 

personally because i run linux i usually do a complete clean install of my os about once a year to the newer version anyway.

 

years ago when the hard drives weren't so large and we didn't have as much ram, then yes doing a reinstall of the os once a year was probably a good idea to keep everything running it's best but now today with the newer os and everything that entails like file systems and better hardware i really don't see the need for regular installs of any operating system.

 

:popcorn: 


Edited by terry1966, 26 April 2014 - 09:01 AM.


#5 Peter1

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 12:42 PM

I understand about the reinstall. I just thought if there was a lot of download carp** left over it might make the machine work harder.

 

As a Linux person you may like to knowI am writing to you from Puppy Linux 5.6 Slacko.

I had a hard ime with the printer but got it.

I also made an Ubuntu 14.04. stick

I updtaed Ubuntu because of the internet issue but read that Puppy updates automatically. Is that so?

I am enjoying putting distros on sticks and experimenting with them. i also use one for sensitive sites like banking.

Peter



#6 terry1966

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Posted 26 April 2014 - 09:29 PM

far as i'm aware peter no linux distro automatically updates, maybe wrong tho, because that would mean giving automatic root permissions to the update program and not a very good security measure in my opinion.

 

they usually just check if there are updates available and then tell you about them so you can choose which updates to install, which then requires you to manually enter in your root password.

 

learn to always question why anything wants you to enter that root password because it is the keys to the castle, and with it the programs can do what they like, including download and install malware.

 

then again tho i do believe your running a live cd which i think run as root anyway so that is another reason why i wouldn't use a live distro as my main operating system, generally you should never log into a system as root but always as a user.

 

glad your enjoying using a linux operating system tho, no different really than using a windows os when you get used to it in my opinion is it.

glad you got the printer working, too.

printers can be hit and miss if they work or not depending on manufacturer, can't remember what make and model my old printer was but the manufacturer was one known to not support linux (think it was dell.) and of course the one i had didn't have any linux support whatever so was only good as a door stop. :rofl:

 

:popcorn:



#7 Peter1

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 06:54 AM

I only really use Ubuntu + Puppy to do $ affairs as I thought is safer.

I do not have a password for either as I feared from my experience with Zocor that I would not get in again.

I did not see the opportunity to create one and would only use one if absolutely necessary. In other words, am I safer with Linux even without the password?

 

Please let me know if I am using Linux for safety moments to no avail.



#8 terry1966

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:02 AM

yes your always much safer using linux than any windows operating system at this moment in time, but best practise, and something you need to get into the habit of for security reasons, is to have a root password and a separate user password for your linux os and always log in and run with a user account and not as root..

 

i just write mine down and stick them to each pc. :rofl:

not the most secure thing to do, but then again i'm securing myself from the outside world and not worried about threats from inside the home.

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 27 April 2014 - 08:13 AM.


#9 Peter1

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:24 AM

Being shut in I am not worried about people looking at my pasowrd list but I do keep it safe.

What is the difference between ?root and a normal password? I keep seeing root.

I will go to both sticks and try to set up a password.



#10 Peter1

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 08:45 AM

terry

I just entered my full and user names on Ubuntu ans admin but could boot in without having to use them. It says my account is not active. This reminds me of the Zorin issue.

The only thing I can change is to add another account or delete mine.

Am I doing something incorrectly?

Peter



#11 Peter1

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 09:37 AM

I finally got it, after much ado.  :clap:



#12 terry1966

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Posted 27 April 2014 - 04:15 PM

:thumbup:

 

root is the same as an admin account on windows and user is like a user or guest account.

yes i set up my machines so it always automatically starts the os and takes me to the desktop using my user account without me having to do anything like having to enter my user password.

 

on your laptop though because it's mobile and could easily be lost or stolen when travelling i'd suggest needing to use the user password before it gets you to a desktop.

this won't stop anyone who's in possession of the laptop from getting at your data with a bit of knowledge but it would make it just that little bit more difficult.

 

anything that needs to be installed or runs that could cause damage (install malware.) needs my permission to do so and i always have to enter the root password.

in my general daily use i don't need to enter the root password ever.

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 27 April 2014 - 04:20 PM.


#13 Peter1

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Posted 28 April 2014 - 06:51 AM

I must have thrown you off . As I said, I am a shut in so do not venture out. With this in mind, and like you, do I have an admin account but set it to just not have to log in by sliding the auto log in to yes.


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