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RealID Act Refused by Maine Lawmakers


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#1 spy1

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Posted 26 January 2007 - 12:14 PM

http://www.aclu.org/...rs20070125.html

WASHINGTON - The state of Maine today became the first state to reject participation in the Real ID Act - the federal law that lays the foundation for a national identity card. The American Civil Liberties Union applauded the move and predicted that it would be just the first in a cascade of state refusals.

"Maine has spoken: Real ID is a real nightmare for local governments" said Caroline Fredrickson, Director of the ACLU Washington Legislative Office. "Real ID is an unfunded mandate that could lead to rampant identity theft. We urge other states to follow Maineís call for privacy. Maineís action makes it crystal clear that Congress must fix whatís broken and significantly revise the Real ID Act."

The Real ID Act federalizes the design, issuance and management of state driverís licenses, creating a uniform identity card and database tantamount to the first national ID card. Under the act, residents of states that fail or refuse to comply will be unable to use their driverís licenses for any activity that requires federally accepted identification, such as boarding airplanes or entering federal buildings.

"This is the beginning of the end of Real ID," said Barry Steinhardt, Director of the ACLUís Technology and Liberty Project. "The Real ID national ID scheme is pointless if one or more states refuse to participate, because the whole premise of the program is the creation of a single uniform national identity document and database."

The Maine resolution, SP 113, passed in both chambers of the legislature. In the State House of Representatives, the vote was 137 to 4, and in the State Senate the vote was unanimous. With the resolutionís passage, Maine is rebuking federal attempts to undermine privacy with no real evidence that such steps enhance security. The resolution is expected to be followed by a statutory rejection of Real ID.

"As Maine goes, so goes the nation," said Charlie Mitchell, Director of the ACLU State Legislative Department. "Already bills have been filed in Montana, New Hampshire, New Mexico, Georgia and Washington, which would follow Maine's lead in saying no to Real ID, with many mores states on the verge of similar action. Across the nation, local lawmakers are rejecting the federal government's demand that they curtail their constituents' privacy through this giant unfunded boondoggle."

For more on the Real ID Act, including its status in various states, go to: www.realnightmare.org
A free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined, but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government."
--George Washington

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#2 spy1

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Posted 27 January 2007 - 11:21 AM

http://www.foxnews.c...,247301,00.html

"Last March, the New Hampshire House of Representatives overwhelmingly approved a bill that would have rejected a $3 million grant for a Real ID pilot program. Democratic Gov. John Lynch supported the bill, but the Senate killed it."

....

"In Maine, House Majority Leader Hannah Pingree, a Democrat, acknowledged that Thursday's resolution is not binding. She said the language saying the state "refuses" to comply with the law "is more expressing our feeling and intent that we're not interested in following through."

But Pingree added that companion legislation yet to be voted on directs the secretary of state, who administers licensing laws, not to comply. Secretary of State Matthew Dunlap has said the law would be costly and difficult to implement."
A free people ought not only to be armed and disciplined, but they should have sufficient arms and ammunition to maintain a status of independence from any who might attempt to abuse them, which would include their own government."
--George Washington

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