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Unable to open paypal homepage


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42 replies to this topic

#16 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 05:55 AM

If your operating system is Windows you go to network and sharing centre, right click on the name of your network, click properties, in the ipv4 option go into those properties, from there you change your dns address

Note 8.8.8.8 is google's DNS server. This is safe to use :)

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#17 Digerati

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 07:42 AM

Excuse me, please clarify what you mean when you said that I may have been onto something from the very beginning?

Also, I don't believe changing DNS settings is a problem. I've fiddled around with changing to Google etc when I had ISP issues, and it was fine!

I meant if no one on his network could access PayPal, it could be a DNS issue. But sadly, the OP never answered when I asked if his computer was the only problem.

And I never said changing settings is a problem. It is easy to do, but the best way is to change DNS settings in the router and I provided a link to easy instructions for that (though Windows instructions are provided too). But the OP has stated he does not have access to the router's config menu.

BTW, while Google's DNS will work, I still recommend OpenDNS. Google already collects too much information on us. No need to tell them everything by sending all our traffic through them.
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#18 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 07:56 AM

Excuse me, please clarify what you mean when you said that I may have been onto something from the very beginning?Also, I don't believe changing DNS settings is a problem. I've fiddled around with changing to Google etc when I had ISP issues, and it was fine!

I meant if no one on his network could access PayPal, it could be a DNS issue. But sadly, the OP never answered when I asked if his computer was the only problem.And I never said changing settings is a problem. It is easy to do, but the best way is to change DNS settings in the router and I provided a link to easy instructions for that (though Windows instructions are provided too). But the OP has stated he does not have access to the router's config menu.BTW, while Google's DNS will work, I still recommend OpenDNS. Google already collects too much information on us. No need to tell them everything by sending all our traffic through them.

Uh, yeah, all of which could be spoofed - only browser, computer etc info can be collected through http headers and JavaScript and flash. Also it's not personal info that can be collected anyways, and I'm sure it's only for analytical purposes.

#19 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:08 AM

Apologies, I also thought you were implying I'm a dodgy person. I misinterpreted your wording I guess

#20 Digerati

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:14 AM

Quote

and I'm sure it's only for analytical purposes.

 

Google is the biggest personal information collector on the planet. They don't collect personally identifiable information, but they know your IP address, the location of your PoP (point of presence - where your ISP connects you to the Internet backbone), your ISP, and your surfing habits to include dates and times.

 

To be sure, I am not totally against Google. I use gmail and Google search all the time. And for sure OpenDNS collects similar information. The collection of this information is unavoidable unless you go with a paid DNS service. I just don't really trust Google as much to protect my information.

 

QuoteApologies, I also thought you were implying I'm a dodgy person. I misinterpreted your wording I guess   

 

 I don't know how you got that, but no, I was not implying or suggesting you were dodgy - only that you might have been right in the first place.
 


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#21 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:25 AM

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and I'm sure it's only for analytical purposes.

Google is the biggest personal information collector on the planet. They don't collect personally identifiable information, but they know your IP address, the location of your PoP (point of presence - where your ISP connects you to the Internet backbone), your ISP, and your surfing habits to include dates and times.
 
To be sure, I am not totally against Google. I use gmail and Google search all the time. And for sure OpenDNS collects similar information. The collection of this information is unavoidable unless you go with a paid DNS service. I just don't really trust Google as much to protect my information.
 

QuoteApologies, I also thought you were implying I'm a dodgy person. I misinterpreted your wording I guess

 I don't know how you got that, but no, I was not implying or suggesting you were dodgy - only that you might have been right in the first place.

What does PoP mean? Is that pinpointing location from router mac address?

I'm pretty sure some websites collect surfing habits for advertising purposes/identitying returning users, etc

#22 Digerati

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 08:59 AM

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What does PoP mean?

 

??? I already showed it. In this case, it means "point of presence" and is where your ISP connects your computer to the Internet. Remember, Google is your friend.

 

In my case, my ISP dumps its customers onto the Internet backbone 10 miles away in the next town over. So for any bad guy trying to find the physical location of my house, that is the closest they can get. This is EXACTLY why I am dismayed at the ignorance of those who complain Microsoft and Windows 10 are such privacy concerns. These folks need to look at their ISPs, not Microsoft. Their ISP knows their home and billing information and billing address, phone numbers, full and real names, even their social security numbers.

 

And the cell phone carriers are even MUCH worse as they know where you are actually standing within a few yards - to include the aisle of the store you are standing in, where you came from, the direction you currently are heading, and how fast you are traveling, who you have phoned and texted, and your full name, billing address and personal information.


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#23 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:23 AM

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What does PoP mean?

??? I already showed it. In this case, it means "point of presence" and is where your ISP connects your computer to the Internet. Remember, Google is your friend.
 
In my case, my ISP dumps its customers onto the Internet backbone 10 miles away in the next town over. So for any bad guy trying to find the physical location of my house, that is the closest they can get. This is EXACTLY why I am dismayed at the ignorance of those who complain Microsoft and Windows 10 are such privacy concerns. These folks need to look at their ISPs, not Microsoft. Their ISP knows their home and billing information and billing address, phone numbers, full and real names, even their social security numbers.
 
And the cell phone carriers are even MUCH worse as they know where you are actually standing within a few yards - to include the aisle of the store you are standing in, where you came from, the direction you currently are heading, and how fast you are traveling, who you have phoned and texted, and your full name, billing address and personal information.

I'm sure ISPs won't hand over information unless required by a court order, in fact that's my ISP's terms of service. If they break it customers could sue the ISP couldn't they?

In fact, I did Google this, I for some reason never thought a backbone is required for isps own network access. So if you go on a site such as ip2location.com , is that to do with backbone location, as in do backbone providers sort out the locations the IPs are assigned to, or is this something different? I don't understand the technical language tbh

As a moderator I'd imagine you can see the IP address I used to register here. I wonder why I live in a different city yet it says I live in Plymouth. Does backbone security explain this?

#24 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:24 AM

Can't edit my posts on my phone sorry, it messes up - as in my keyboard just disappears when I try to type? to correct myself tech team member not a moderator

#25 Digerati

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:49 AM

Quote

I'm sure ISPs won't hand over information unless required by a court order, in fact that's my ISP's terms of service. If they break it customers could sue the ISP couldn't they?

 

Of course no "reputable" ISP will never "hand over" that information without a warrant. Not the point, however. They can and do use and sell much of that information to direct marketers and others for various tracking purposes - to include targeting you with specific ads based on your past searches or other browsing habits.

 

But more importantly, no company or organization is immune from hacks from bad guys who will steal all your personal information. It was just on the news today about Arizona and Illinois Voter Information Hacked.

 

Right, I am on staff but not a mod. But to your Plymouth scenario, that exactly illustrates my point PoPs. Your ISP connects its customers to the Internet in Plymouth just as mine connects us in the next town over. It has nothing to do with security and everything to do with the physical location of your ISP's PoP. Think of the PoP as the DCO (dial central office) for the Internet. Your home is connected to the ISP or phone company's network at the junction box, perhaps on the pole near your house that then goes back to the PoP/DCO which could be several miles away.

 

Now as a staff member here, it is my duty to help keep threads on topic and this has now drifted way off. So back to the OP and his problem.


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#26 DevDream

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 09:54 AM

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I'm sure ISPs won't hand over information unless required by a court order, in fact that's my ISP's terms of service. If they break it customers could sue the ISP couldn't they?

Of course no "reputable" ISP will never "hand over" that information without a warrant. Not the point, however. They can and do use and sell much of that information to direct marketers and others for various tracking purposes - to include targeting you with specific ads based on your past searches or other browsing habits.
 
But more importantly, no company or organization is immune from hacks from bad guys who will steal all your personal information. It was just on the news today about Arizona and Illinois Voter Information Hacked.
 
Right, I am on staff but not a mod. But to your Plymouth scenario, that exactly illustrates my point PoPs. Your ISP connects its customers to the Internet in Plymouth just as mine connects us in the next town over. It has nothing to do with security and everything to do with the physical location of your ISP's PoP. Think of the PoP as the DCO (dial central office) for the Internet. Your home is connected to the ISP or phone company's network at the junction box, perhaps on the pole near your house that then goes back to the PoP/DCO which could be several miles away.
 
Now as a staff member here, it is my duty to help keep threads on topic and this has now drifted way off. So back to the OP and his problem.

I apologize, I think I have a tendency to derail threads. I'll try to cut it out though

Can I start my own thread about it?

#27 Digerati

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Posted 30 August 2016 - 10:05 AM

 

Can I start my own thread about it?

Of course, but it seems it has been thoroughly discussed already.


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#28 Hugh Jackson

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 01:19 AM

I did say that it happened both on the computer AND on the laptop, it's in the original post...



#29 Digerati

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 08:31 AM

Sorry Hugh. You did indeed say it happened with a PC and a laptop. That just reinforces the need to check what is in common with both systems and that would be the router (unless someone setup the same custom hosts file in both systems - and that is likely something you would know about). So again, this might require using a 3rd party DNS service like OpenDNS which is best set in the router's admin menu, or contacting your ISP to see if they can help.

 

Just out of curiosity, what are you using for security?


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#30 Hugh Jackson

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Posted 31 August 2016 - 11:16 AM

It's OK man i will find some other way to do it,

I'm using Windows 10 which apparently has its own security system.


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