Jump to content

Build Theme!
  •  
  • Infected?

WE'RE SURE THAT YOU'LL LOVE US!

Hey there! :wub: Looks like you're enjoying the discussion, but you're not signed up for an account. When you create an account, we remember exactly what you've read, so you always come right back where you left off. You also get notifications, here and via email, whenever new posts are made. You can like posts to share the love. :D Join 92408 other members! Anybody can ask, anybody can answer. Consistently helpful members may be invited to become staff. Here's how it works. Virus cleanup? Start here -> Malware Removal Forum.

Try What the Tech -- It's free!


Photo

Linux


  • Please log in to reply
71 replies to this topic

#61 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 10 June 2016 - 04:54 PM

Yes, I did read the link about sand boxing, thank you.

I found it interesting that this author advocates deleting cookies as a preventative measure. There is a setting in most browsers, as you likely know.

We could over kill and use a VM with Sandboxie and set to remove cookies when closing.

I almost bought Sandboxie way back but have not paid for any computer service yet and won't start now.

It seems if your surfing and download habits are careful, you are way ahead.

I like MBAM and defender b/c they both are in the context menu so you can scan before opening.

Is your work computer related, if I may ask and also did you used to use DOS before Windows.

When the computers converted to Windows back then, my fried was so upset because his skills were DOS related.


    Advertisements

Register to Remove


#62 terry1966

terry1966

    SuperMember

  • Visiting Tech
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,988 posts

Posted 10 June 2016 - 07:24 PM

no i don't work peter, and pc's are just a hobby for me, but i have had proper training in everything computer related but that was in the early 80's, when i built my first pc and was taught to program in varies computer languages. dos is a high level language compared to some i learned to program with and don't think it was even invented when i started programming.

 

:popcorn:


Edited by terry1966, 10 June 2016 - 07:24 PM.


#63 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 11 June 2016 - 05:54 AM

I often wondered where you got your base for computer lore b/cit certainly shows when you address a situation.

I thought you were jumping to answer questions between moments at work.

I certainly wish I had some training earlier but there were no computers til later in life -much later. We had given my daughter a randomizer type machine in he late 70's but that was all that was available. I always thought DOS evolved into Windows to show how little I know. You lived though a very revolutionary digital time and were wise enough to take advantage of it.

B/c of you and the other skilled mods newbies like me can sort of work issues out even though we are less skilled.

From my point of view, imaging has been the greatest feature of computers that I have run into. One an go from a virtual mess to a corrected situation in no time.

I will leave for New England in 2 weeks for 9 days of rest with family then when I return will begin the 3rd stage of this tumor disease with 43 consecutive radiation incidences.So if I am erratic regarding communication, you know why.

I have more hormone therapy  in the fall but at least I will be home.

What prompted you to use the Linux system? I'll bet it was that you could do all Windows can but in a more private environment.

I guess I can consider myself a pro now that I can build a VM, right?  :) Is Ubuntu worth using in a VM or on a stick as so many people use it. i did once and it was fairly easy.



#64 terry1966

terry1966

    SuperMember

  • Visiting Tech
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,988 posts

Posted 11 June 2016 - 10:26 AM

just got fed up spending hours maintaining windows when linux just worked without all the fuss, never needed to defrag my hard drives or run any clean up or scans for example more than any privacy reasons.

of course the main benefit was the extra security run a linux os gave, the main and only disadvantage was i couldn't play a lot of windows games i was into at the time and why i started out with a dual boot system before finally ditching windows altogether, to me it just wasn't worth the cost of the os, and even if you gave me windows 10 i still wouldn't use it, but that's because i think microsoft built in "features" to the os that take to many liberties with everyone's privacy, i own my hardware not them.

 

 

Is Ubuntu worth using in a VM or on a stick as so many people use it. i did once and it was fairly easy.

personally i'd use the vm just because it's there but i don't think there are any security benefits the vm has over a live usb or vice versa.

 

 

I guess I can consider myself a pro now that I can build a VM, right?

most definitely. 

 

take care and look after yourself. :thumbup:

 

:popcorn:



#65 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 11 June 2016 - 02:00 PM

Hi terry

i am writing to you from my 16 GB pen drive which holds Mint.

I am not sure to sign out and back into Windows.

Maybe you can give me a few tips about the OS as to what to do first. I guess that would be updates. I allowed for considerable persistence.

I read your previous post and it all makes sense that is why I am here trying to pick up ideas. I know the flash drive is not the best media but it is a start.

Peter

 

PS To leave the Mint OS I had to shut the PC down. Isn't there a better choice so you shut Mint down but go to Windows.

Maybe a restart would bring me to Windows?


Edited by Peter1, 11 June 2016 - 03:44 PM.


#66 terry1966

terry1966

    SuperMember

  • Visiting Tech
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,988 posts

Posted 11 June 2016 - 08:02 PM

 

PS To leave the Mint OS I had to shut the PC down. Isn't there a better choice so you shut Mint down but go to Windows.

Maybe a restart would bring me to Windows?

your booting to a totally separate os, so the only way you can get back into windows after booting to the usb stick is to shutdown the pc and then boot into windows, a restart is exactly the same thing, shuts down the pc and then starts it back up again.

 

if you have the boot order set in uefi/bios to always boot the usb stick first then if the stick is plugged in you should get a menu asking if you want to run mint live or boot the hard drive, if you boot the hard drive it will boot into your windows os other wise it will boot into mint.

 

think of it like this, your pc is an empty filing cabinet, so before the filing cabinet is useful it needs to be filled with files.

now if you fill it with windows files then before you can use mint you need to empty out the windows files and then fill it again with the mint files and vice versa.

shutting down the pc empties out the files, booting the pc fills it with files, it's up to you which files you want it to fill it with, either windows or mints.

 

vm's work in a different way because you fill the pc with windows files but then you can also have a folder in the cabinet filled with mints files too, that way you can have access to both os at the same time, and it's the only way to load 2 os onto a machine so you can switch between the 2 without having to shutdown the pc first.

 

:popcorn:



#67 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 12 June 2016 - 01:16 PM

I understand and thanks. I tried to use he stick as a means of playing around with Linux but on the second boot I found the screen frozen showing mint .            I waited for 5 minutes then knew I had to hard boot. I tried alt, ctrl,  del  then esc.  but nothing 'unfroze' it. The stick was 16 GB.

 

I have stared a new project now;

I am transferring all my notes relevant to the phones and all Android to Google Drive, and keeping all the Windows computer notes in F+ F's in Windows. This will allow us to sync all with phone and Chromebook. We are going to simplify. As long as  I can I will maintain Windows but being computer illiterate my wife will have an easier machine to work with >Chromebook.

It will be easier to use for her as she just emails and writes a note or two. Security and maintenance along with upgrades and updates will be easier for her also.I am aware of big brother so nothing sensitive will go in any machine. Off to work!

Enjoy your weekend.

peter



#68 terry1966

terry1966

    SuperMember

  • Visiting Tech
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,988 posts

Posted 12 June 2016 - 02:20 PM

 

I understand and thanks. I tried to use he stick as a means of playing around with Linux but on the second boot I found the screen frozen showing mint .            I waited for 5 minutes then knew I had to hard boot. I tried alt, ctrl,  del  then esc.  but nothing 'unfroze' it. The stick was 16 GB.

i'd guess that's a usb stick problem and data corruption because your using it with persistent storage so when you updated things and those updates were stored onto the stick some data probably got corrupted so the next time you booted it things froze.

 

in my experience usb sticks are not very reliable and fail quickly especially when you write to them a lot and why i only ever use them for running a non persistent live os or transferring the occasional file from pc to pc and never for actually running an os from where data is constantly being written to it.

 

if i was you i'd format it and then burn the ubuntu live iso onto it again but this time with no persistent storage and use it only as a live os where nothing else gets written to the stick and it's only read from when you boot it, to put the os into the pc's memory, then you shouldn't have any problems and find it reliable to use. when using the live os you can always store any date you might not want to lose on either the external hard drive or the internal hard drive.

 

:popcorn:



#69 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 12 June 2016 - 02:21 PM

I see. I'll give it w try and thank you



#70 Gary R

Gary R

    MRU Administrator

  • MRU Teachers
  • 1,468 posts

Posted 19 June 2016 - 10:51 AM

The advantage of running Linux from a USB drive rather than from a VM, is that you can see whether the particular Linux distro is compatible with your hardware or not, when running a "guest" OS in VM it is hardware independent.

 

If all you're wanting to do is test/use the Linux features, this is not a problem, but if you have plans to convert your machine to a dual-boot configuration at some point in the future, then you'll want to know that the distro you intend to install alongside Windows is compatible with your hardware.


    Advertisements

Register to Remove


#71 Peter1

Peter1

    member

  • Authentic Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,942 posts
  • Interests:Grandchildren, puttering, pc.

Posted 19 June 2016 - 01:31 PM

I understand and thank you for your help.



#72 Gary R

Gary R

    MRU Administrator

  • MRU Teachers
  • 1,468 posts

Posted 19 June 2016 - 11:19 PM

You're welcome, have fun using Linux. :thumbup:


Related Topics



0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users