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Understanding protocol!


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9 replies to this topic

#1 vijay.gupta

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Posted 01 October 2010 - 12:51 PM

I undestand what is a protocol: it is a set of rules agreed upon by 2 or more computers that they will follow while communicating with each other. Now, my query is: who creates a particular protocol and does he specify somewhere that only these applications can use that protocol while creating the protocol? If not, then what is the need to create different protocols?

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#2 paws

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Posted 04 October 2010 - 06:54 AM

Does this help?
http://what-is-what....s/protocol.html
also take a look here:
http://vlaurie.com/c...es/protocol.htm
as this provides a slightly different perspective
Regards
paws
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#3 vijay.gupta

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Posted 09 October 2010 - 11:57 PM

Sorry Paws for late responding. I got TCP and IP very well. One is responsible for creating packets and reassembling them while the other is used to route these packets. It is very simple. Now, the complexity begins when more protocols start coming in to picture. For eg: Mail Protocols (SMTP, POP and IMAP)...what is the need to create these protocols when eventually these protocols will also use TCP and IP to distribute the information from one end to other end...can you please explain this?

#4 vijay.gupta

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 04:42 AM

Can any one please repond to this topic please?

#5 paws

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 05:38 AM

Hi, extracting from the above links I think you will find this explains it quite well:

One protocol, TCP/IP, was used to specify the use of another protocol, HTTP. This is an example of high- and low-level protocols and how they interact. TCP and IP are low-level protocols, that are used in establishing the basic connection between two computers on a network. However, just simply connecting does nothing practical, and information must actually be transferred. Just like the low-level protocol defines the properties of the connection, a high-level protocol (such as HTTP) defines the properties of the data transfer. In addition to the familiar HTTP protocol, other common Internet protocols include FTP (File Transfer Protocol), DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol), SMTP (Simple Mail Transfer Protocol), POP3 (Post Office Protocol version 3), and IMAP (Internet Message Access Protocol). You have probably noticed that all these acronyms end in the letter "P". In fact, whenever encountered with an unfamiliar computer-related acronym that ends in "P", there is a very good chance that it defines a protocol.


To sum up (and greatly simplify) one protocol is used to specify another protocol.
Regards
paws
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#6 vijay.gupta

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 06:56 AM

In an attempt to understood the concept you are trying to explain, I am making analogy for the statement "low-level protocol (such as TCP and IP) defines the properties of the connection, a high-level protocol (such as HTTP) defines the properties of the data transfer". Please let me know if I am correct or not?

While TCP and IP only creates, route and reassemble the data packets between 2 computers on public network, HTML specify the the format of that packet. Is it correct?

In an attempt to explain my query more clear, I am explaining scenario to help me understand. Please read it also:

Suppose I typed http://www.yahoo.com and pressed Return key, browser first sends the request to my ISP's DNS server, ip address of yahoo.com is fetched from DNS server and then the request to this ip address is made. The request to the web server is sent and the information from the web server is received in the form of packets. These packets are created, routed and re-assembled by TCP and IP/UDP protocols.

In this process, what HTTP(s) protocol is doing?


This is just an example so that I could understood HTTP protocol. Once I got it, I think I will understood all the other protocols automatically.

Also, I have already gone though the links that you have sent me. They were very informative in the sense that I got the working of TCP/IP but not for all the protocols.

Edited by vijay.gupta, 14 October 2010 - 06:58 AM.


#7 paws

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 08:35 AM

Hi,

Suppose I typed http://www.yahoo.com and pressed Return key, browser first sends the request to my ISP's DNS server, ip address of yahoo.com is fetched from DNS server and then the request to this ip address is made. The request to the web server is sent and the information from the web server is received in the form of packets. These packets are created, routed and re-assembled by TCP and IP/UDP protocols.

In this process, what HTTP(s) protocol is doing?


If you have a look here,
http://www.theshuler...aper/index.html
all should be revealed...here is a summary extracted from the link

When you type a URL into a web browser, this is what happens:
If the URL contains a domain name, the browser first connects to a domain name server and retrieves the corresponding IP address for the web server.
The web browser connects to the web server and sends an HTTP request (via the protocol stack) for the desired web page.
The web server receives the request and checks for the desired page. If the page exists, the web server sends it. If the server cannot find the requested page, it will send an HTTP 404 error message. (404 means 'Page Not Found' as anyone who has surfed the web probably knows.)
The web browser receives the page back and the connection is closed.
The browser then parses through the page and looks for other page elements it needs to complete the web page. These usually include images, applets, etc.
For each element needed, the browser makes additional connections and HTTP requests to the server for each element.
When the browser has finished loading all images, applets, etc. the page will be completely loaded in the browser window.
Regards
paws
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#8 terry1966

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 12:57 PM

The Internet is a near-infinite collection of data. Various standardized methods or protocols are used to transfer data safely and securely over the web. A protocol is a commonly understood set of instructions that two digital machines use to communicate.


taken from here:- http://www.ehow.com/...-protocols.html

might be easier to think of each protocol as a separate language.. for example if you wrote "hello mate" in english, frech and spanish they would all look differently and only able to be understood by someone who could speak that language..

same thing applies with protocols they can only be translated and made sense of by programs on your pc that understands them, the message gets from a to b the same way using either tcp or udp connection and the message may be exactly the same in each protocol but only the program they are meant for will be able to read them.

:popcorn:

#9 vijay.gupta

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 01:58 PM

@ terry - Exactly this is what i was thinking this of. l know the classes of applications for some of protocols. Please let me know if i am wrong. Pop3 and smtp: e-mail clients http(s): web browsers Can you please let me know the classes of applications for which each protocol is defined: imap tcp ip/udp ftp rtsp

#10 paws

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Posted 14 October 2010 - 02:29 PM

Here's the info you seek
http://www3.rad.com/.../protocols.html
http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc2326.txt
Regards
paws
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