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SPAM frauds, fakes, and other MALWARE deliveries...


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#1306 AplusWebMaster

AplusWebMaster

    AplusWebMaster

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Posted Today, 05:38 AM

FYI...

Fake 'unpaid invoice' SPAM - xls malware
- http://myonlinesecur...el-xls-malware/
20 Oct 2014 - "An email pretending to be an unpaid invoice and threatening court action with a subject of 'Acorn Engineering Limited trading' is another one from the current bot runs which try to download various Zbots, cryptolocker, ransomware and loads of other malware on your computer. They are using email addresses and subjects that will entice a user to read the email and open the attachment... The email looks like:
   Acorn-Maintenance-Engineering-logo...
    October 20, 2014
    Head Office
    Acorn Engineering Limited trading
    as Acorn Maintenance
    Acorn House
    20 Wellcroft Road
    Slough
    Berkshire
    SL1 4AQ
    Tel: 01753 386 073
    Fax: 01753 409 672
    Dear ...
    Reference: 48771955-A8
    Court action will be the consequence of your ignoring this letter.
    Despite our telephone calls on October 10 and our letters of September 25, 2014 and October 20, 2014, and your promise to pay, payment of your account has still not been received. If full payment is not received by October 22, 2014 court action will be taken against your company.
    If you allow this to happen you will incur court costs and you may forfeit your company’s credit status because the name of your company will be recorded by the major credit reference agencies. This may deter others from supplying you.
    You are also being charged debt recovery costs and statutory interest of 8% above the reference rate (fixed for the six month period within which date the invoices became overdue) pursuant to the late payment legislation.
    To stop this from happening please pay in full now the overdue invoice which is also attached to this letter.
    Yours truly,
    signature-Mishenko.gif (626?272)
    Nadine Cox,
    Accountant
    Acorn Engineering Limited
    Enclosure (Attachment)


20 October 2014: Copy4313_B0.zip: Extracts to: Invoice_7380901925299.xls.exe
Current Virus total detections: 3/54* . This is another one of the spoofed icon files that unless you have “show known file extensions enabled“, will look like a proper Microsoft Excel xls file instead of the .exe file it really is, so making it much more likely for you to accidentally open it and be infected..."
* https://www.virustot...sis/1413800273/
___

Fake PDF invoice SPAM
- http://www.symantec....more-you-expect
Oct 20, 2014 - "... Over the past week, Symantec has observed a spam campaign involving suspicious emails that masquerade as unpaid invoices. However, these suspicious emails come with a nasty surprise attached in the form of a malicious .pdf file.
Malicious .pdf file attached to suspicious email:
> http://www.symantec....031/Fig1_19.png
While these invoices may appear to be legitimate because the sender’s email address may be associated with a major company, the emails contain spelling errors in the subject line and the body of the email contains just one line of text. Most business emails contain a personal greeting to the recipient and the sender’s signature, but these emails have neither. These signs should serve as warnings to users that the email is not what it claims to be. The attached .pdf file has malicious shellcode hidden inside of it that will be executed when opened with a vulnerable version of Adobe Reader... attackers are trying to exploit the Adobe Acrobat and Reader Unspecified Remote Integer Overflow Vulnerability (CVE-2013-2729) by triggering the vulnerability while parsing the crafted Bitmap encoded image... The embedded shellcode acts as a downloader which downloads a malicious executable file (Infostealer.Dyranges) from a remote location. The downloaded malware attempts to install itself as a service called “google update service”... If successful, the malware is then able to steal confidential information entered into Web browsers by the user. Symantec recommends that users exercise caution when opening emails and attachments from unexpected or unknown senders. We also advise that PDF viewers and security software be kept up-to-date. Symantec detects the malicious .pdf file used in this campaign as Trojan.Pidief*."
* http://www.symantec....1022-99&tabid=2
___

Fake 401k SPAM - PDF malware
- http://myonlinesecur...ke-pdf-malware/
20 Oct 2014 - "An email pretending to come from Carla Rivers < CarlaRivers@ fidelity .com > giving detailks of the October 2014 401k fund performance results  with a subject of '401k June 2014 Fund Performance and Participant Communication' is another one from the current bot runs which try to download various Zbots, cryptolocker, ransomware and loads of other malware on your computer. They are using email addresses and subjects that will entice a user to read the email and open the attachment... The email looks like:
     Co-op 401k Plan Participants –
    Attached you will find the October 2014 401k fund performance results as well as an informational piece regarding online calculators available on the website.
    If you are a facility manager, please forward, print or post a copy of these pages on your bulletin board or in a conspicuous place where your employees can see them.
    Please contact me if you have any questions.
    Carla Rivers
    Employee Benefits/Plan Administrator ..


20 October 2014: October-2014-401k-Fund.zip : Extracts to: October-2014-401k-Fund.scr
Current Virus total detections: 3/53* . This is another one of the spoofed icon files that unless you have “show known file extensions enabled“, will look like a proper PDF file instead of the .exe file it really is, so making it much more likely for you to accidentally open it and be infected..."
* https://www.virustot...sis/1413823356/
... Behavioural information
DNS requests
cyba3 .co.uk (94.136.40.103)
TCP connections
188.165.214.6: https://www.virustot....6/information/
94.136.40.103: https://www.virustot...03/information/
___

Fake 'LogMeIn Security Update' SPAM – PDF malware
- http://myonlinesecur...ke-pdf-malware/
20 Oct 2014 - "An email that says it is an announcement that you need to install a new 'LogMeIn security certificate' which  pretends to  come from LogMeIn .com < auto-mailer@ logmein .com >  with a subject of October 16, 2014 'LogMeIn Security Update' is another one from the current bot runs which try to download various Zbots, cryptolocker, ransomware and loads of other malware on your computer. They are using email addresses and subjects that will entice a user to read the email and open the attachment...

Screenshot: http://myonlinesecur...rity-update.png

20 October 2014: cert_client.zip: Extracts to: cert_1020.scr
Current Virus total detections: 1/52* . This October 16, 2014 'LogMeIn Security Update' is another one of the spoofed icon files that unless you have “show known file extensions enabled“, will look like a legitimate file  instead of the .exe file it really is, so making it much more likely for you to accidentally open it and be infected..."
* https://www.virustot...sis/1413811609/
___

Fake 'my new photo ;)' SPAM - trojan variant
- http://blog.mxlab.eu...trojan-variant/
Oct 20, 2014 - "...  intercepted a new trojan variant distribution campaign by email with the subject “my new photo ;)”... sent from the spoofed email addresses and has the following short body:

    my new photo ;)

The attached ZIP file has the name photo.zip, once extracted a folder photo is available with that contains the 57 kB large file photo.exe . The trojan is known as a variant of HEUR/QVM03.0.Malware.Gen or Win32:Malware-gen. At the time of writing, 2 of the 53 AV engines did detect the trojan at Virus Total*..."
* https://www.virustot...sis/1413812842/
___

Fake Invoice SPAM – word doc malware
- http://myonlinesecur...rd-doc-malware/
20 Oct 2014 - "An email pretending to come from Adobe with the subject of 'Adobe Invoice' is another one from the current bot runs which try to download various Zbots, cryptolocker, ransomware and loads of other malware on your computer. They are using email addresses and subjects that will entice a user to read the email and open the attachment... This email has an attachment that looks like a proper word.doc but something has disinfected all copies on its travels. All copies that I have received have been -less- than 1kb in size and are empty files with a name only adb-102288-invoice.doc . They are almost certainly supposed to be the typical malformed word docs, that contain a macros script -virus- we have been seeing so much recently that will infect you if you open or even preview them when you have an out of date or vulnerable version of Microsoft word on your computer... The email looks like:
    Adobe® logo     
    Dear Customer,
    Thank you for signing up for Adobe Creative Cloud
    Service.
    Attached is your copy of the invoice.
    Thank you for your purchase.
    Thank you,
    The Adobe Team
    Adobe Creative Cloud Service...


Never just blindly click on the file in your email program. Always save the file to your downloads folder, so you can check it first. Most (if not all) malicious files that are attached to emails will have a faked extension..."

- http://blog.dynamoo....e-spam-adb.html
20 Oct 2014
Screenshot: https://1.bp.blogspo...s1600/adobe.png
> https://www.virustot...sis/1413809174/
... Behavioural information
TCP connections
62.75.182.94: https://www.virustot...94/information/
208.89.214.177: https://www.virustot...77/information/
___

Dropbox phish - hosted on Dropbox
- http://www.symantec....-hosted-dropbox
Updated: 18 Oct 2014 - "... In this scam, messages included links to a -fake- Google Docs login page hosted on Google itself. We continue to see millions of phishing messages every day, and recently we saw a similar scam targeting Dropbox users. The scam uses an email (with the subject "important") claiming that the recipient has been sent a document that is too big to be sent by email, or cannot be sent by email for security reasons. Instead, the email claims, the document can be viewed by clicking on the link included in the message. However, the link opens a -fake- Dropbox login page, hosted on Dropbox itself.
Fake Dropbox login page:
> http://www.symantec....1/Dropbox 1.png
The -fake- login page is hosted on Dropbox's user content domain (like shared photos and other files are) and is served over SSL, making the attack more dangerous and convincing. The page looks like the real Dropbox login page, but with one crucial difference. The scammers are interested in phishing for more than just Dropbox credentials; they have also included logos of popular Web-based email services, suggesting that users can log in using these credentials as well. After clicking "Sign in," the user’s credentials are sent to a PHP script on a compromised Web server. Credentials are also submitted over SSL, which is critical for the attack's effectiveness. Without this, victims would see an unnerving security warning.
Security warning:
> http://www.symantec....1/Dropbox 2.jpg
Upon saving or emailing the user's credentials to the scammer, the PHP script simply -redirects- the user to the real Dropbox login page. Although the page itself is served over SSL, and credentials are sent using the protocol, some resources on the page (such as images or style sheets) are not served over SSL. Using non-SSL resources on a page served over SSL shows warnings in recent versions of some browsers. The prominence of the warning varies from browser to browser; some browsers simply change the padlock symbol shown in the address bar, whereas others include a small banner at the top of the page. Users may not notice or understand these security warnings or the associated implications. Symantec reported this phishing page to Dropbox and they immediately took the page down. Any Dropbox-hosted phishing pages can be reported to the abuse@dropbox.com email address..."
 

:ph34r: :ph34r:  <_<


Edited by AplusWebMaster, Today, 02:42 PM.

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