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IMMEDIATE HELP! SCREEN TURNED RED!


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47 replies to this topic

#1 Immortal

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Posted 14 March 2008 - 09:34 PM

After starting my computer and signing on my log in name, my computer took about ten seconds or so to initiate the start-up exe's. Right before my computer initiated McAfee, my screen turned red. It was a plain red. It was weird, though. It started at the top as red, but it faded to white as it got closer to the bottom. I didn't really know wtf was up, so I hit the reset button on my computer. My computer started up normally. I decided it was best to just shut my computer down and make a topic here with a different computer.

I am going to open up my computer case and check everything to make sure things are connected properly.

If you need any information about my previous situation, the link below is to a thread I posted about a week ago on this forum:
http://forums.whatth...Lag_t89628.html

I understand what the Red Screen of Death is. This red screen was not it. This screen had no text. It was, as I said, red at the top and slowly faded to a pinkish white at the bottom. I reset my computer almost immediately after it happened.

Edited by Immortal, 14 March 2008 - 11:06 PM.


#2 Abydos

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 02:28 AM

Hi Immortal

Sorry to hear about your prob's......

Anyways, I am fairly certain thats its because of your monitor, and nothing with/within your PC. That it started just when your Mcafee booted up, I think is mere coinsidence. But to be sure, you might wanna check for any possible viruses.(Altho I personnally have never heard of one causing that kind of behavior)

Degaussing your monitor might do the trick.
Degaussing can be found in your monitors screen-menu, or refer to your manual if you can't find it.
Degauss it, wait ˝ hour before turning it on again.
If this was the problem, be certain that in the future, you don't have any unshielded magnetic items near the monitor, like speakers and such.

If your monitor doesn't have a degauss function, get hold of one that does(Borrow one if you haven't got one). Place the two monitors front to front, and the one that can degauss will help degauss the one without!

Second possibility, is that the monitor is going for broke, and its time to replace it.
Have you tried hook the monitor up on another PC, and see if the problem is still there? And vice versa......

As a side-question; Do you have color schemes on your PC??

Thats my 2cents. If this aint the solution(s), you have to wait it out, for one thats more competent in the ways of monitors and such :unsure:

Regards Abydos

Edited by Abydos, 15 March 2008 - 02:29 AM.


#3 Digerati

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 06:15 AM

Ummm, well, I think there is some confusion here about degaussing monitors. You degauss CRT monitors, NOT LCD monitors. You degauss a monitor to clear the electromagnetic forces buildup in the screen caused by the high voltages present with CRTs. These unwanted magnetic forces can alter the magnetic fields used for targeting, changing the trajectory of the color beams as they are fired from the guns at the phosphors on the back side of the vacuum tube, distorting the picture. For MANY, MANY years, you have not had to manually degauss a CRT screen because most monitors do it automatically when powered up, as characterized by a distinctive "bwoing" sound. You typically would only need to degauss CRT monitors when left on for extended periods of time.

LCD and Plasma monitors do NOT use high voltages, magnetic fields, color guns, or particle beams fired through a tube. Therefore, they NEVER become charged with excessive electromagnetic forces, therefore, LCD monitors NEVER need degaussing.

I have never heard of putting one CRT in front of the other. In the old days when we degaussed radar screens, we had to "isolate" the monitors to prevent the magnetic field from one monitor impressing (dumping or collapsing) onto another monitor. Putting one in front of the other may cause the field from one to dump on the other, but at best, they would simply equalize, and not be dissipated completely.

Since Immortal indicated in his first post he has a Samsung SyncMaster 220WM, a LCD monitor, he has nothing to degauss.

The problem is either with the monitor, or the card (or on-board graphics) - assuming all cables and cards are securely fastened, including any detachable cables on the back of the monitor. As Abydos suggested, I would try another monitor on that computer, or that monitor on another computer. If the problem stays with your computer, you know it is probably the graphics card (or motherboard, if on-board). If the problem follows the monitor to the new computer, you know it it the monitor.

Edited by Digerati, 15 March 2008 - 06:17 AM.


#4 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 09:15 AM

Thanks for the help. I'll post a reply with my findings as soon as possible. But, I would like to know how to test my monitor properly on a different computer. I don't have TF2 or COD4 on my other computers to test this monitor. Is there some test or downloadable program I can run that can help me test my monitor?

Edited by Immortal, 15 March 2008 - 09:39 AM.


#5 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 10:48 AM

I think it might be my monitor, to some degree. I hooked up my brother's Samsung SyncMaster 940BW to my computer. When I logged on and my desktop started loading, the display seemed to load faster than with the SyncMaster 220WM. I played TF2 and COD4 on the SyncMaster 940BW, but the graphical stuttering and ping problem still occurred. I'm guessing maybe my wireless adapter and/or wireless router just isn't powerful enough. But, I doubt my wireless adapter and/or wireless router would cause my screen to turn red. When I plugged my SyncMaster 220WM in after I had unplugged my bro's SyncMaster 940BW, the desktop loaded slower than normal. Although, the resolution was lower than the 220WM's native resolution. The resolution had stayed at 940BW's native resolution after I had unplugged it and plugged in the SyncMaster 220WM. When the desktop loaded slower than normal, the icons on the desktop were all the default icon (the one that is a white page with top right corner folded in and a centered window with a red, blue, and green symbol in the center). Those default icons didn't start to load the actual icons until several seconds later. Also, it took about five seconds to load up my start bar. Before that five seconds, all that was displayed was my background. Is this because the SyncMaster 220WM was out of its native resolution? Also, a very curious thing happened after everything was loaded: my monitor's display became slightly dimmer. It happened almost immediately, but I could tell that the display became dimmer. Any thoughts?

#6 Digerati

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 11:04 AM

When you swap monitors, you should be powering down the computer AND unplugging the power supply from the wall (or flip the PSU master power switch, if it has one). Then swap monitors, power up and and set up the resolutions properly and see what happens.

#7 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 07:07 PM

Also, I was wondering what I could use to test if my graphics card has gone bad. 3DMark?

#8 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 08:12 PM

Holy carp**, boys! I don't know what the flying forester has gotten into my computer. But, recently I tried installing Starcraft onto my computer. Normally, I expect the Starcraft menu to pop up on its own when I put it in my CD-Drive. It didn't! So, I went to my computer and double clicked the D: icon, which almost froze up my computer!!! I had to go into task manager, cancel my process for looking into My Computer folder, and then wait because there was no process that was listed to justify the 56% computer usage that occurred for about a minute until finally a send error report window came up and my computer went back to normal. Does this explain my ping on TF2 and COD4, the graphic stuttering, my screen turning red, and the seemingly slow startups? I have no effing clue. But, it seems like my computer is going to hell on a freight train. All I know is that I have had this computer for only about 6 months, and this has only just begun three weeks or so ago. Just to let you know, I never tried to install anything on this computer via CD-Drive after the first waves of problems occurred three weeks or so ago. So this is new to me! WTF IS UP WITH MY COMPUTER!?!?1!?limx->0sinx/x!! AAHHHHH!!! My friends bring up that it could also be the power supply. Is there anyway to check it?

Edited by Immortal, 15 March 2008 - 08:17 PM.


#9 Digerati

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 08:23 PM

I keep a FrozenCPU Ultimate PSU Tester in my travel tool bag. It is not as good as a qualified technician testing the power supply unit (PSU) under a true load with an oscilloscope, but close. The advantage of this model is that it has an LCD readout of the voltage. With an actual voltage readout, you can better detect a "failing" PSU. Lesser models use LEDs to indicate the voltage is within some "range". These are less informative, considerably cheaper, but still useful for detecting PSUs that have already "failed". Newegg has several testers to choose from. All these testers contain a "dummy load" to fool the PSU into thinking it is connected to a motherboard, and therefore allows the PSU to power on, if able, without being attached to a motherboard - great for testing fans too. Alternatively, you can swap out the PSU with a known good one that meets the computer's power requirements.

Have you done a complete malware scan? One of the firsts thing I do when troubleshooting a PC is make sure I have a clean platform to work from. That's clean of heat trapping dust and dirt, as well as malware. Here's a link to my canned text on Cleaning Out Malware. Use it if you don't already have a complete security suite and disk cleaning utilities to rid your system of malware and clutter. You can also use it as a guide to build your own security suite, and to help you develop or enhance a "Practicing Safe Computing" self-discipline.

As for testing your card, you can go to Start > Run, and enter: dxdiag and work your way through all the tests.

Are you overclocking? If you are, don't.

Edited by Digerati, 15 March 2008 - 08:23 PM.


#10 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 08:30 PM

Thanks, Digerati! But, what are your thoughts on my obvious problem with my CD-Drive? Could it be malware? That doesn't seem likely because I've already gone through extensive testing via the folks at Spyware Beware forums and on my own. So, it is undeniably a hardware issue. I just don't understand how a CD-Drive can cause all these problems. It's absurd! But, it seems to be the likely case. I'll try and see if someone can check out my PSU. But, if my PSU shows up fine, what then? Do you think my CD-Drive could be sucking in too much power from the PSU to get its stuff done? This is just one massive discombobulation.

#11 Digerati

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 08:35 PM

I would believe power before CD. You can always disconnect the CD and see what happens. Have you added hardware since the PSU was new? Does you PSU have enough power?

Use the eXtreme PSU Calculator Lite to determine your power supply unit (PSU) requirements. Plug in all the hardware you think you might have in 2 or 3 years (extra drives, bigger or 2nd video card, more RAM, etc.). Be sure to read and heed the notes at the bottom. I recommend you set Capacitor Aging to 30%, and if you participate in distributive computing projects (e.g. BOINC or Folding@Home), I recommend setting TDP to 100%. Research your video card and pay particular attention to the power supply requirements listed on your video card maker's website for your card. Then look for power supply brands listed under the "Good" column of PC Mechanic's PSU Reference List. Ensure the supplied amperage on the +12V rails of your chosen PSU meets the requirements of your video card. Don't try to save a few dollars by getting a cheap supply. Digital electronics, including CPUs, RAM, and today's advanced graphics cards, need clean, stable power. A good, well chosen supply will provide years of service and upgrade wiggle room. I strongly recommend you pick a supply with an efficiency rating equal to, or greater than 80%.

#12 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 09:22 PM

I have a 500W at 12V and 26Amp power supply. My GPU said it needs 450W minimum. My brother was the one who purchased the power supply for me. I asked for at least a 600W, but he said he was laughed at when he asked for one. So, I compromised. I don't know why. I'm pretty sure it was a bad move. I'll be checking my PSU soon enough, though.

Edit: I am now in the market to purchase a new PSU after calcuating what wattage I needed. I found out that I am 277W under what I should need at 100% system load.

Here's what I put in for my Power Supply Calculator at http://www.extreme.o...n.com/PSUEngine :

System Type: Dual Sockets (because Intel Pentium D is a dual processor)

Motherboard
: Regular Desktop or High-End Desktop (I'm not sure what mine is, but it's a 50W difference: GigaByte GA-945P-S3 Motherboard, you be the judge of its quality)

CPU: Intel Pentium D 950 3400 MHz Presler

CPU Utilization
: 100% TDP (as recommended by Digerati)

Ram: 2 Sticks DDR2 SDRAM

Video Card: nVidia GeForce 8800 GTX (626/2000) (My GPU is 8800GTX OC 768MB, I'm guessing 626/2000 is the overclocked version right?)

Hard Drives: 1 SATA HDD

Drives: 1 DVD/CDRW Combo Drive

Additional PCI Card (avg.)
: 1 Card (This additional PCI Card is my NETGEAR WG311v3 Wireless G PCI adapter, I don't think it qualifies for any of the check boxes under PCI Cards)

USB: 3 Devices (My flash drive, Logitech Headset, and Wireless Keyboard/Mouse combo)

Fans: 3 120mm LED's and 1 250mm Regular (They didn't have 200mm on the menu, so I went for 250mm. To clarify even more, I use all the stock fans that came with my Antec 900 case)

System Load: 100%

Capacitor Aging: 30% (recommended by Digerati)

I do have a question about my current situation. There is obviously a need for a better power supply, regardless if it is the main source of my problems. But, will I still have the problems with a new, better power supply. What I mean to say is, do you think my hardware could've been harmed in some way because of the inadequate power supply for the 6 months since I've built this computer?

Edited by Immortal, 15 March 2008 - 09:51 PM.


#13 Immortal

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Posted 15 March 2008 - 11:10 PM

I have found two power supplies that I like:

OCZ: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817341008

Antec: http://www.newegg.co...N82E16817371009

The question I have is are there any cons to getting an 850W PSU when I only need a 750W PSU? I'm talking electricity bill costs -- will my PSU run at a constant 850W when it is on?

Obviously I won't need all 850W now, but when I get to the point that I do need it, will my PSU still serve me as well as it did when I first bought it? Or will I need to buy another 850W when I come to that point?

Also, this is the first time I've really done PSU shopping. So, either you guys tell me whether or not these PSU's are compatible with my computer or you point me in the direction of some guide that will tell me. But...

...there are a few questions that I do have, if you guys don't mind answering:
I get lost at the multiple +12V rails. My GPU needs 26A on a +12V rail, but most multiple +12V rail PSUs don't even get near 26A.
Also, my Mobo has a 24-pin, not a 20+4-pin power connector. Does the 20+4-pin still get the job done?

Here is my rig, again, for those who've just started reading:

LG Multi Drive (DVD +/- CD +/-) IDE
Western Digital Caviar SE 250 GB, 3 Gb/s, 8 MB Cache, 7200 RPM
Samsung 2GB DDR2 RAM
OnePower 500W, 12+V @ 26A
Intel Pentium D 3.40GHz
GigaByte GA-945P-S3 Motherboard
PNY 8800GTX 768MB OC
Antec 900
Samsung SyncMaster 220WM
NETGEAR WG311v3 Wireless G PCI adapter
Comcast Broadband
Belkin G Wireless Router

Edited by Immortal, 15 March 2008 - 11:11 PM.


#14 Digerati

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 05:49 AM

Okay, you need to go back in and read the calculator instructions carefully.

You have a single socket motherboard - not a dual. With a single CPU and using your other figures, I come up with 557 watts.

Do note that setting the CPU utilization and System Load values to 100% builds in a respectable overhead and it is not likely you will reach those power demand levels. This allows for the PSU to be operate under a reasonable load, without being under stress.

Your computer will draw from the wall what it needs (assuming the PSU is able to deliver). This means if your computer needs 400 watts, it will draw from the wall 400 watts, regardless if the PSU is a 500 watt supply or a 800 watt supply.

There is much hype about multiple +12V rails - but the move is now to go back to 1 big 12V rail as seen with PC Power and Cooling and Corsair supplies. With multiple rails, the power is divided between the rails, and each rail is limited in terms of the current available. In other words, one rail can be maxed out and wanting more current, but it is not available even when the PSU is capable, because it has been dedicated to the other rails. In a single rail PSU, all the power of the PSU is available at all times. A good thing.

See Power Supply Myths Exposed!. Keep in mind this was put together by PC P&C, so some of the statements may be slightly biased, but generally it is the way it is.

#15 Immortal

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Posted 16 March 2008 - 08:53 AM

Oh...I thought dual socket meant if your CPU was a dual core. Now I see that it means if there are physically, two separate CPUs in the motherboard. I never really imagined that those types of motherboards were on the market for personal use. I chose dual socket, thinking it was dual core. Thanks for all the help, Digerati! I'll be looking for a PSU soon enough. But... ...I still need to know if I should still be checking my other hardware. It seems that my current PSU is only 58W off the mark where it should be, at maximum load. So, do you think that my other hardware (GPU, CPU, Drives, HDD, etc.) could've been damaged from 6 months or so of inadequate power supply? Also, most of the PSU's that I bring up don't have two 6-pin PCIe connectors, which are needed for my 8800GTX GPU. Some have an extra 4-pin or 8-pin. I was wondering if there's anyway to convert that extra 4-pin or 8-pin into a 6-pin PCIe connector and if doing so would be worse than just getting a PSU with two stock 6-pin PCIe connectors. Thanks for helping me out so much so far. I appreciate it so much.

Edited by Immortal, 16 March 2008 - 09:10 AM.




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